The leader in pharma sales, Pfizer is well known thanks to several household name drugs, including Lipitor, Advil, Celebrex, Zithromax and the ever-abundant "little blue pill," Viagra. As the company looks at the looming Lipitor patent cliff, CEO Ian Read has been searching for new methods to keep revenue high, other than new approved drugs. Recently, the company has been considering spinning off portions of the company to create smaller, more profitable arms, a polar opposite of former CEO Jeffrey Kindler's bulk-up strategy of years past. The company's past purchases and mergers have included King Pharmaceuticals, Warner-Lambert, SUGEN and a $68 billion purchase, Wyeth, in 2009.

Wyeth provided Pfizer with an influx of 17 new drugs and vaccines, including Enbrel, Effexor, Prevnar and Pristiq, and Pfizer declared the merger made them "one of the most diversified companies in the global health care industry." And the company continues to move forward as it focuses on hot areas, including Alzheimer's, oncology and vaccines.

The company's legal woes have caused headaches as well. Pfizer has paid over $340 million in settlements for its menopause treatment, Prempro and has 1,200 cases pending for the anti-smoking drug Chantix. Back in 2009, it paid $1.3 billion for illegal marketing fines for the painkiller Bextra, making it the largest fine in United States history.

Pfizer has stayed in the top two on FiercePharma's annual layoffs list for the past three years, thanks in part to the company's 2009 megamerger with Wyeth, and the pressure could be felt for another five years. The company also placed second in the Top 15 R&D Budgets, with $7.4 billion in 2009. But those numbers will continue to slip as Pfizer looks towards development deals instead of in-house research.

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Forget Pfizer and Allergan, Teva is the pharma getting the most market love these days

All of the market buzz may center on Pfizer's $160 billion tax inversion deal to buy Allergan, but Teva Pharmaceuticals is really getting the market love.

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Pfizer may be amped about its brand-new agreement to tie up with Allergan and move to tax-advantaged Ireland. But U.S. politicians? They're not so thrilled with the idea.

With veteran job-choppers Pfizer and Allergan joining hands, how many layoffs are in the cards?

Both Pfizer and Allergan have a history of doing "transformational" deals--and those can come along with serious layoffs. So now that they've joined hands in a $160 billion merger agreement, is there reason to expect any different?

With Pfizer and Allergan set for a $160B megamerger, what becomes of R&D?

Pfizer and Allergan have confirmed what many long suspected, agreeing to merge in a $160 billion deal that gives the former a much-desired tax break and the latter a predictable final resting place. But the combination Pfizer's penchant for postdeal job cuts and Allergan's well-established aversion to early-stage research paints a cloudy picture of how R&D will get done at what would be the world's new largest drugmaker.

UPDATED: Pfizer finally gets its inversion with $160B Allergan megamerger agreement

The agreement's been made: The boards at Pfizer and Allergan have ratified a megamerger--worth about $160 billion--that will create the world's biggest pharma company and send Pfizer overseas, the companies announced on Monday.

Allergan CEO Saunders could cash out Pfizer deal with $187M, Bloomberg figures

Even if Brent Saunders does not get the CEO role at Pfizer as a condition of Allergan agreeing to a buyout, which is reportedly being demanded, he will still get a huge payday from the deal. In the short time that he has been CEO of Allergan,  Bloomberg  figures he has collected shares and options that should allow him to cash out for nearly $190 million.

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Samsung Bioepis is months away from winning European clearance to market a copy of Amgen and Pfizer's blockbuster rheumatoid arthritis treatment Enbrel, securing a positive recommendation from EU regulators.

UPDATED: Pfizer prepared to risk a 3% breakup fee for chance at Allergan, sources tell Reuters

Breaking up can be hard to do. It can also be expensive, which would be the case for Pfizer if the roughly $150 billion deal it is reportedly negotiating with Allergan were to go south. But the potential cost is a sum that Pfizer is reportedly willing to wager as it tries to outrun changes in the U.S. tax code that would make the kind of tax-inversion deal it is negotiating unpalatable.

Pfizer and Allergan wend toward a $150B merger, reports say

Pfizer and Allergan are coming down to the wire on a merger that would be the biggest pharma deal ever. The all-stock transaction would be worth up to $150 billion, at a price of $370 to $380 per share, according to media reports, though analysts have estimated a per-share price of up to $400.

Pfizer, Allergan in final talks for all-stock deal worth a record-breaking $150B

Pfizer and Allergan are coming down to the wire on a merger that would be the biggest pharma deal ever. The all-stock transaction would be worth up to $150 billion, at a price of $370 to $380 per share, according to media reports, though analysts have estimated a per-share price of up to $400.